Doughboys unloading from transportDoughboys unloading from transport in France in 1918. As determined by post-war interviews with German soldiers and citizens, "The Germans fear the Americans more than any other enemy forces on the front.”

What German soldiers thought about Americans in the aftermath of World War I 

via the We Are The Mighty web site 

Exploding in his HandsAmerican intelligence wasn’t particularly developed around the time of World War I. In fact, Americans, especially President Woodrow Wilson, didn’t much care for the idea of American spies.

As the war raged on in Europe, the positive results of intelligence activities conducted by the British began to change people’s minds. In fact, British intelligence collecting the Zimmerman Telegram helped get the U.S. into the war in the first place. The note was an offer by Germany to support Mexico in a war with the United States, should the U.S. enter World War I. The British intercepted the note and published it for the world to see.

After the war, American military intelligence officers reviewed troves of documents that detailed interrogations and intercepted diplomatic cables. They compiled the opinions of German soldiers and citizens upon meeting Americans for the first time.

It was released in a 1919 report called “Candid Comment on The American Soldier of 1917-1918 and Kindred Topics by The Germans.”

The preface of the 84-page report says it contains the unedited, “unfavorable criticism” of Germans against Americans and soldiers in the American Expeditionary Forces and that “much of the comment is favorable is, therefore, significant.”

Here are the top 10 comments about the American soldier from the point of view of their German enemy:

Read the entire article on the We Are The Mighty web site here:

 

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